8 Comments


  1. ·

    Cool post! I really love this blog and the Labs.Some other cool/rare languages I know of…Ubykh – a North West Caucasian language once spoken on the eastern coast of the Black Sea with no official writing system but rich oral literature. Very unique for its interesting agglutinative verb system and having the largest consonant inventory of all documented languages (27 distinct fricatives, 27 sibilants, 20 uvular consonants). Unfortunately went extinct in the 1990s.Hadza – a language isolate spoken by fewer than 1,000 people in Tanzania of the Hadza people, the last full-time hunter-gatherers in Africa. Being taught to most children, however. Has many clicks sounds being a member of the Khoisan language family.Pitkern – a Tahtian/English-based creole spoken on Pitcairn Island, a group of four volcanic islands with 50 residents who are descendants of European mutineers from the 18th century or so. Related to the Norfuk language with fewer than 100 speakers worldwide.Ket – a Siberian isolate possibly linked to the Yeniseian languages family, spoken by around 500 hunger-gatherer natives of the Ket people in Russia. Threatened with extinction unfortunately.Enjoy!Brian


  2. ·

    Cool post! I really love this blog and the Labs.

    Some other cool/rare languages I know of…

    Ubykh – a North West Caucasian language once spoken on the eastern coast of the Black Sea with no official writing system but rich oral literature. Very unique for its interesting agglutinative verb system and having the largest consonant inventory of all documented languages (27 distinct fricatives, 27 sibilants, 20 uvular consonants). Unfortunately went extinct in the 1990s.

    Hadza – a language isolate spoken by fewer than 1,000 people in Tanzania of the Hadza people, the last full-time hunter-gatherers in Africa. Being taught to most children, however. Has many clicks sounds being a member of the Khoisan language family.

    Pitkern – a Tahtian/English-based creole spoken on Pitcairn Island, a group of four volcanic islands with 50 residents who are descendants of European mutineers from the 18th century or so. Related to the Norfuk language with fewer than 100 speakers worldwide.

    Ket – a Siberian isolate possibly linked to the Yeniseian languages family, spoken by around 500 hunger-gatherer natives of the Ket people in Russia. Threatened with extinction unfortunately.

    Enjoy!
    Brian


  3. ·

    Thanks, Brian.

    Some interesting languages in your list as well. Ubykh looks particularily cool.


  4. ·

    Except for the Khoisan languages, I was unaware of the rest of these languages. That is an interesting information to know. Thanks for that example. I think Riau is an easy language to learn. Lol.

  5. Parrish777
    ·

    One thing about having a limited amount of time each day or week to learn a language is that it can force you to get down to the meat of the material. If you match that up with consistency (a long period of time) then your on the right track.

  6. Parrish777
    ·

    One thing about having a limited amount of time each day or week to learn a language is that it can force you to get down to the meat of the material. If you match that up with consistency (a long period of time) then your on the right track.

  7. Parrish777
    ·

    This is a cool feature. I have a love for new languages!


  8. ·

    Holy smokes! 64 cases?! I thought Finnish was killer enough with 14 (15?). And I've heard about Khoisan languages from Russell Peters himself. He was speaking of his African experience, which included having met a man named '!xobile', pronounced '*click* bile'!

    I don't come from the Riau region of Indonesia .. but even so, the grammar of Riao Indonesian is suspiciously simple .. even for Indonesian! I think it's closer to Malay than it is to Indonesian …

    But anyway, I'm afraid I don't have any cool, obscure languages to add on to this list.

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