How Did Swedish Go?

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Attention: If you want to learn or improve your Swedish, please try my Interlinear Swedish bilingual book. This book is a Swedish book by Selma Lagerlöf translated in the innovative Interlinear format, where the translation is provided below each word. Such format lets you read and improve your Swedish easily regardless of your level.

(I have not posted for a while, have I?) This is to answer the questions over my Swedish. I stopped learning Swedish in August 2012, when I left Stockholm. I had been in Stockholm for two and a half months and I had learned a bit of Swedish before then.

To answer your questions, I think my Swedish got pretty okay as for the short time, i.e. I would call myself as having a strong B1/a weak B2 level in most areas in the language. I could have conversations over things on streets no problem, I could listen to and understand the gist of most news in KlarText and I could (still can) read Swedish newspapers and understand the gist of the articles as well, although I do have problems with details once in a while. Using a dictionary can remedy all of these and I have no problem getting around in the grammar (well, some prepositions are hard but otherwise it is good).

While in Stockholm, I also went to Oslo, Norway for four days and I just spoke Swedish most of the time, being understood and answered to in Norwegian most of the time as well. Had a blast.

So, another question arises: how did I learn it? Well, once again, I had an environment that was inducive to speaking English. I used a couple of things.

  • First, I used the meetings in language exchange Stockholm. There is a symbolic membership fee and then you can go on forever, they have a lot of weekly meetings and they also make sure you have a native speaker in each circle, where you speak only Swedish. It is very interesting indeed.
  • Second, as usual, I would read newspapers and translate words I did not know. Helped me well.
  • Third, I spoke to people on streets whenever I could. That was helpful although in a somewhat limited way.
  • Fourth, I got a language exchange partner, although I could not find one in Stockholm: I got one who helped me on Skype. She was really helpful and we had a lot of super-interesting Skype conversations in Swedish, where we talked about a lot of different topics.

So all in all, Swedish was really fun. I loved the language as well. I would love to continue with it and learn it properly because it is such an awesome language. Jag gillade mycket att prata svenska och jag skulle vilja fortsätta det en dag.

I had another language challenge after that – Russian

So, right after Sweden, I had another language challenge that I did not tell you about – Russian. I was in a native-speaking country. Well, somewhat native speaking. Making progress in my Russian was deeply satisfying and I achieved an even higher level than in Swedish. But I may tell you about it some other time.

What’s next?

Well, currently I am working hard on some projects that I will tell you about when I am done. I am also working on CoolJugator – a project that offers Lithuanian, Russian, Greek, Latvian and Estonian verb conjugation in a user-friendly way. Do check it out!

Attention: If you want to learn or improve your Swedish, please try my Interlinear Swedish bilingual book. This book is a Swedish book by Selma Lagerlöf translated in the innovative Interlinear format, where the translation is provided below each word. Such format lets you read and improve your Swedish easily regardless of your level.

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Learning Swedish!
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11 Comments

  1. Pat & Bill Chapman
    ·

    I’d be interested to read your views about Esperanto

  2. Jeff
    ·

    Här har du en infödd svensk. :) Skriv om det är något du undrar över.

  3. Prof Paul
    ·

    You have to take the upper hand with Swedes no matter how horrible your Swedish is. They will submit eventually. Even they speak English back to you, just keep answering them in Swedish. They will respect you for being serious about learning their language. Even if a Sweden speaks fluent English, they prefer to speak their mother tongue if they can. 

    I know it’s difficult venturing out of your international environment in the beginning, but if you can make friends that are just normal Svensons, then you have a much easier time. Volunteering to help old people can be a great source for this. 

    Getting out of Stockholm and making friends in the rural communities is also a big help.

    I would stay away from the inner city pubs and nightlife though, but it’s your call.

    I have a bunch of videos on Youtube that help people learn Swedish really quickly if you like. Just look up Speak Swedish Stupid.

    And if you ever wanna chat in Swedish on Skype, just send me a letter.

    Lycka till!


  4. ·

    Thanks for the tips! I actually wrote that post when I was a bit upset but on the other hand I think I am making really good progress in Swedish. I have gone to several language meetups and I now tend to speak it on streets and study it a lot. I think it should work out fine in the end.

    I will check out your videos.

    And for Skype, I might be interested since Skype practice is nice.


  5. ·

    Tack så mycket. Har du et en e-postadress vart jag skulle kunna skicka frågor när jag har dom?


  6. ·

    I know this is common, and my experience was a bit of an overstatement of how bad it is. Slowly but firmly, I still get to practice Swedish.

    I would like to find native speakers for regular practice, though. I will check out those sites you mentioned.

    Thanks for all the support!


  7. ·

     You’re welcome, I really hope that helps you, keep us updated.

    Cheers,
    Andrew


  8. ·

    Congratulations on reaching your goal with Swedish, it’s not the easiest language to learn. I have a lot of respect for you!
    Good luck with all of your language-learning endeavors :)


  9. ·

    Sounds great. I’m interested in Swedish, although I couldn’t say exactly why! Maybe it’s because I lived with a Swedish girl for a year in college? Anyway, great people, and they have the same hair colour as me. When I went to Stockholm I kept getting locals asking me directions in Swedish – kind of a dream situation for a language learner! Of course I had to answer them in English! Maybe I’ll make Swedish the next language on the list!

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