Portuguese Basics: Lesson 4

Refer to “time” – “tempo”. Say:

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Let’s talk about not wanting things now.

The word não steals the word for it and puts it directly after não.

So, while you are saying “ele quere o”, you would be saying “ele não o quer” if you have não in the sentence because não steals o.

Try this referring to the house – “a casa”. First, without não:

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Now, with não:

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Refer to moneydinheiro (which’s is masculine because it ends in o). Talk to a man. Say:

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The Portuguese word for to know is saber.

You can get to know everything if you have a light-saber.

Remember that if you want to make to do into he does, you just usually remove the last letter r.

The Portuguese word for word is palavra.

The English word palaver – a prolonged or long discussion – supposedly comes from the same root.

You are talking to a man. You are referring to the word in both parts of the phrase. How would you say:

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Alright. Do you still remember the word for to have?

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If you were to make it into he has, as usually, you would remove the last letter and you would have ele te for he has.

However, this is one of these rear exception words and it adds another letter to itself – m – so it becomes ele tem.

That em in tem is a nasal sound as well (as I told you, em always are).

How would you say:

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You are talking to a woman. Still refering to time.

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Still talk about time. How would you say:

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Great. There is one last thing we want to learn about “tem”.

You remember how if quer has the word it - o or a - after it, it adds an e at the end and becomes quere. Just because it’s easier to pronounce it this way.

Well, tem o or tem a would also be hard to pronounce because em is a nasal sound so tem does a trick similar to this as well…

The word it - o or a – gets after tem gets an n and becomes no or na.

So, talk about the house to a man again. How would you say:

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Talk about time now. Don’t repeat o senhor twice (it sounds a little bit more natural if you don’t – although it’s not a big mistake to do so). Say:

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Finally, still about time:

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Niice. That’s all I wanted for this lesson.

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