Kant: Lesson 1

What Matters is the Motive/Immanuel Kant

Translate this: < click on this button afterwards to find out the correct answer
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

What is Freedom

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

“Here, then, is the link between freedom as autonomy and Kant’s idea of morality. To act freely is not to choose the best means to a given end; it is to choose the end itself, for its own sake – a choice that human beings can make and billiard balls( and most animals) cannot” (109).

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

What’s moral? Look for the Motive

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

“What matters, Kant tells us, is that the good deed be done because it’s the right thing to do – whether or not doing it gives us pleasure” (115).

“As long as he(spelling bee hero) did the right thing for the right reason, feeling good about it doesn’t undermine its moral worth” (116).

Translate this:
Your answer:

What is the Supreme Principle of Morality?

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

What are the following contrasts?

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Categorical Versus Hypothetical Imperatives

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Morality and Freedom

“We can now see the link, as Kant conceives it, between morality and freedom. Acting morally means acting out of duty – for the sake of the moral law. The moral law consists of a categorical imperative, a principle that requires us to treat persons with respect, as ends in themselves. Only when I act in accordance with the categorical imperative am I acting freely” (124).

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Questions for Kant

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

This question falls into the 4th contrast, the contrast of standpoints.

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this: ”We can’t prove that they [morality and freedom] exist, but neither can we make sense of our moral lives without __________________________ them” (129).
Your answer:

Sex, Lies, and Politics

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this:
Your answer:

Translate this: Kant didn’t tell us what this contract would look like or what principles of justice would follow from it. Who did a couple of centuries later?
Your answer: