Japanese: Lesson 2

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The Japanese word for I is "watashi". Watashi can mean either "I" or "me".

How would you say "It is me"?

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So far we have always been leaving out part of the sentence. That is the normal way people speak in Japanese. But sometimes you will need to specify exactly who or what is doing the action.

When you keep that part of the sentence, you always need to add "ga" after it. "Ga" is spelt G A. It means that you are saying who or what did the action. If there is no action, and it is just a describing sentence like these ones we have been learning, then it means you are saying who or what is being described.

So, remembering to put a "ga" after "Watashi", how would you say politely "I am a teacher"?

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How would you say "The sushi is totally empty"?

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How would you say "The sushi is liked"?

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You use "watashi" to talk about yourself, but when you are talking to another person you might need to use the word "you" which is "anata". Think of "another person" to remember than "anata" means "you".

Ta and te were converted into da and de by adding a double quote mark in the top right corner. The same trick is used to change the letters "ka" and "ki" into the letters "ga" and "gi". So how would you write the letter "ga"?

ga: が

The letter "shi" in "sushi" and "watashi" is just a single curve.

shi: し

This letter is always pronounced "shi", but it is actually the letter "si". In a hiragana alphabet table this letter is where you would expect to find the letter "si", in the same column as letters like "sa", "su", "se", and "so". But for unknown reason, si is always pronounced "shi" in Japanese.

So how would you write politely "do you like sushi?", literally "Is sushi liked?"

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